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Settings could not be saved error

It's not likely but possible to encounter the following error when saving a module:

Settings could not be saved.

The reason for this error is that sensitive code containing tags such as <script> or <iframe> has been inserted into a post title, post content, or comment, and either the user role does not have the required capability or the wp-config.php file contains a filter that disallows saving this sensitive code.

User role does not have the right capability#

In this case, the error message says:

Settings could not be saved.
These settings contain sensitive code that is not allowed for your user role.

We detected a possible issue here:

The sensitive code is then displayed.

In WordPress, user roles, (such as Administrator or Editor, contain a set of capabilities, which define the particular tasks that users can perform. Custom roles, such as the Shop Manager in WooCommerce or custom roles that you create, have a custom set of capabilities.

One capability is called unfiltered_html. User roles with this capability are allowed to enter sensitive code with tags such as <script> or <iframe> into post titles and content. By default, only the WordPress Administrator and Editor roles have this capability, while only the Super Admin role has it on multisite installations. Here's more information about this capability. The WooCommerce Shop Manager role does not have the unfiltered_html capability, and other custom roles may not have it, even though users with this role can perform many other types of administrative tasks.

If you see this error, you'll not be able to save without removing the sensitive code or employing one of the following workarounds:

  • Log in with a user role that includes the unfiltered_html capability, such as WordPress Admin or Editor.
  • Use a WordPress plugin that gives you the ability to assign different capabilities to roles, such as the User Role Editor plugin, and assign the unfiltered_html capability to the user role you want to have it.
  • Use the fl_builder_ui_js_config filter to give users the unfiltered_html capability in Beaver Builder layouts, see the Filter Examples below.

See the last section for more information about what WordPress considers sensitive code.

See our blog post for basics about WordPress user roles.

The DISALLOW_UNFILTERED_HTML setting is in use#

In this case, you'll see the following version of the error.

Settings could not be saved.
These settings contain sensitive code that is not allowed as DISALLOW_UNFILTERED_HTML has been set globally via wp-config.

The sensitive code is then displayed.

This version of the error happens when the WordPress wp-config.php file has the following setting:

define( 'DISALLOW_UNFILTERED_HTML', true );

This setting prevents all users, regardless of their user role capabilities, from being able to insert sensitive code in the title and body of posts and pages. See the last section for more information about what WordPress considers sensitive code.

In this case, the alternatives are:

  • Remove the DISALLOW_UNFILTERED_HTML setting from the wp-config.php file for your WordPress installation.
  • Remove the sensitive code from the title or content of your Beaver Builder layout and save your layout.
  • Add the following filter to give users the unfiltered_html capability in Beaver Builder layouts.

Filter examples#

If you want to preserve the DISALLOW_UNFILTERED_HTML = true or sensitive code but override it in Beaver Builder for specific user roles, you can add the fl_builder_ui_js_config filter to their child theme's functions.php file. Here are some code examples of this filter in use.

Note

This filter gives the user roles mentioned in the filter the unfiltered_html capability only in the Beaver Builder editor, not in WordPress.

The following snippet gives all user roles the unfiltered_html capability.

add_filter( 'fl_builder_ui_js_config', function( $config ) {
$config['userCaps']['unfiltered_html'] = true;
return $config;
} ,10);

The snippet below gives a specific user role (in this case the WooCommerce Shop Manager role) the unfiltered_html capability.

add_filter( 'fl_builder_ui_js_config', function( $config ) {
$user = wp_get_current_user();
$role = $user->roles[0];
if ($role == "shop_manager") {
$config['userCaps']['unfiltered_html'] = true;
}
return $config;
} ,10);

This code snippet gives both the Shop Manager and Author roles the unfiltered_html capability.

add_filter( 'fl_builder_ui_js_config', function( $config ) {
$user = wp_get_current_user();
$role = $user->roles[0];
if ($role == "shop_manager" || $role == "author") {
$config['userCaps']['unfiltered_html'] = true;
}
return $config;
} ,10);

You can add any user roles to the filter. See the WordPress documentation about roles.

WordPress sensitive code#

Every WordPress installation includes a file called kses.php, which contains a list of HTML elements and attributes that are considered safe. KSES is an acronym for "kses strips evil scripts." Here's a good article about KSES and the wp_kses function in WordPress.

With the unfiltered_html user capability and the DISALLOW_UNFILTERED_HTML setting in wp-config.php, WordPress makes it possible to restrict code that can be used for malicious purposes and to limit users who are able to enter code with sensitive tags or attributes.

By default, Beaver Builder follows these WordPress restrictions on sensitive code, while offering you the ability to add a filter to override them in your layouts.

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